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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
: the ntsb believes this device may make a difference. i passed. so that means the car would start? >> right. >> reporter: it's called an ignition interlock that keeps impaired drivers from starting their vehicles. if they've been drinking more alcohol than allowed by court -- >> most likely you'll get a fail. >> reporter: and then what? >> and then the car won't start. >> reporter: already required in 17 states, the ntsb now recommends all states require ignition interlocks for first-time offenders. >> if we can save ten lives, 100 lives, we will recommend what we think needs to be done to address impaired driving. >> reporter: the ntsb studied more than 1,500 wrong-way crashes over a five-year period. 60% of these accidents involved alcohol and many drivers had prior convictions for drunk driving. not everyone supports the recommendation. the american beverage institute points out that drunk driving fatalities are at historically low levels. that's little assurance for ginger's mother. >> the experience took away a beautiful daughter, a beautiful mother, a beautiful sister. >> reporter: a
demonstrate that its batteries are safe. both ntsb and faa investigators are tonight on their way to japan. boeing says it is cooperating with this investigation. brian? >> tom costello in our dc newsroom tonight. tom, thanks. >>> a scary early-morning tragedy in central london today that could have been much worse. two people were killed when a helicopter collided with a construction crane atop a tall building. there's a report the chopper pilot had requested to put down because the weather had closed in. the crash ignited a large fire in the busy vauxhall neighborhood. the pilot was killed along with one person on the ground. nine were injured. all of it has londoners watched the scene unfold on live morning television. >>> now to another big and still-developing story tonight. american citizens among perhaps dozens of people taken hostage by islamic militants in algeria in northern africa. it's right next door to mali where not coincidentally, french war planes have been pounding militants there for days. tonight, the u.s. state department has strongly condemned this hostage-taking, cal
hersman is chairman of the ntsb. >> we have learned from accidents, we have plowed all of those lessons back in. they have been embraced in many cases, and we're not seeing repeats of those same accidents. >> reporter: but experts say two actions in which human failure was at least partly to blame. underscore that, remains the biggest threat to safety. air france 447 crashed into the atlantic in 2009, killing 228. that same year, regional airline, flight 3407, crashed in buffalo, killing 50. >> colgan air was a watershed event in aviation safety, in particular bringing the regional carriers up to standards with the major carriers. >> reporter: the safety culture is spreading, accident rates are dropping, in russia, africa, latin america. the caribbean and asia. despite the improvement in safety, experts say there is a real danger here. just when you start to think it can't happen again is very often when you're most vulnerable. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >> when we continue on this new year's eve, two men who have learned some hard lessons, now passing them on and making a diff
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)